GR ST/ENGL 536X. Preparing publishable thesis chapters (3 credits)

Section 1: (Fall. Spring.) Reporting original research results within the norms for writing of a student's discipline. Emphasis on preparing thesis/dissertation chapters that will be both acceptable to the Graduate College and ready for submission to a refereed journal in the student's discipline. Focus on reporting student-generated data, norms for discourse within disciplines, and how thesis chapters differ from journal manuscripts. Particularly helpful for students preparing a research article. Prerequisite requirements:

  • Data collected and analyzed for at least one manuscript of thesis/dissertation
  • Completed course work in the research methodologies of the discipline
  • Advanced stage in the degree program (preferably in the penultimate semester).

Section 2: (Fall. Spring.)Focus on the writing conventions of research genres as well as on best practices of academic writing mentoring. Particularly helpful for students who intend to pursue an academic career. Students interested in becoming consultants in the new Graduate Peer Mentor Program are encouraged to enroll in Section 2 and receive the training needed for such a position. Prerequisite requirements:

  • Experience conducting research (individual and/or collaborative)
  • Completed course work in the research methodologies of the discipline
  • Scholarly communication experience (e.g., publications, conference presentations)
  • Permission of instructor.

GR ST/ENGL 569. Grant Writing (1 credit)

Section 1: (Spring) Focus on funding opportunities at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Students gain ‘hands-on’ experience in proposal writing via six activities. Each activity involves guidance by the instructor via class discussions, use of rubrics tailored for this course, and peer review in class. Students will also meet with writing consultants from the Center for Communication Excellence (CCE). Students revise their assignment at each stage, before submitting the final product to the instructor for detailed feedback. Students are encouraged to work with their adviser in developing an NSF proposal during this course. The six activities comprise the major components of an NSF proposal. Ideally, students finish the course with a polished draft of an NSF proposal. To provide a model for success, the instructor works with students to secure a copy of an awarded proposal in their field.The topics include: 1) an overview of the NSF funding process; 2) finding funding; 3) developing a fundable idea; 4) generating specific aims for the proposal, with emphasis on hypothesis-driven research; 5) grantmanship concerning specific components of the proposal, e.g., the overview, significance, innovation, team context, and the approach. Students will also develop a budget, Budget Justification, Project Timeline, and Project Summary. They will consider use of graphics and develop a Broader Impacts section for their proposals. Students also meet with writing consultants from the Center for Communication Excellence (CCE) and are encouraged to work with their adviser in developing a proposal during this course.

Section 2: (Spring) Focus on funding opportunities for the disciplines in the arts, humanities and social sciences, including the Fulbright U.S. Student program. Students are encouraged to write their own proposal drafts if an opportunity is deemed to be a good fit for their current research and degree program. Students read and review grant proposals in mock panel review sessions to learn the review process firsthand and participate in in-class discussion and review of peer work. Comparable to Section 1, the course topics include: 1) an overview of the funding process; 2) finding funding; 3) developing a fundable idea; 4) generating research questions and specific aims for the proposal; 5) grantmanship concerning specific components of the proposal. Students develop a Budget, Budget Justification, Project Timeline, Logic Model, Dissemination Plan, and Project Summary and consider whether the use of graphics would be appropriate within the proposal. Students gain ‘hands-on’ experience in proposal writing via eight activities. Each activity involves guidance by the instructor via class discussions, use of rubrics, and peer review in class. Students revise their assignment at each stage, before submitting the final product to the instructor for detailed feedback. Students also meet with writing consultants from the Center for Communication Excellence (CCE) and are encouraged to work with their adviser in developing a proposal during this course.


Other courses at ISU

GR ST 566. Communications in Science. (0.5-0) Cr. 0.5. Alt. S.
Focus on writing analysis by reading and reviewing manuscripts, oral and poster presentations. Prerequisite requirement: graduate classification.

GR ST 586. Preparing Future Faculty Intermediate Seminar. Cr. 1-3.
Consideration of a wide range of faculty life issues. Includes topics such as higher education trends, diversity issues, learning styles, assessment, grant and proposal writing, and legal and ethical issues. Written components include job and teaching portfolios. Prerequisite requirements:

  • At least two prior years of graduate classification
  • Admission into PFF program
  • Completion of 585 or permission of instructor.

GR ST 588. Preparing Future Faculty Special Topics. Cr. 1.
In-depth study of topic providing academic professional development. Credit for or concurrent enrollment in GR ST 586. Prerequisite requirements:

  • Permission of instructor
  • GR ST 585.

ENGL 101D. English for Native Speakers of Other Languages: Academic English II--Graduates. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.
ENGL 101D courses are limited to students who are nonnative speakers of English. Placement in various sections is determined by examination. (See English Requirement for International Students in Index.) Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option. Credit from Engl 101D does not count toward graduation. Prerequisite requirement: recommendation of English Department.

ENGL 508. Advanced Workshop in Academic Writing. (3-0) Cr. 3.
Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. Rhetorical analyses of student-selected academic journals. Discussion of current trends in academic writing. Professional perspectives on the referee process and on journal editorial decision making. Focus on the writing of selected short pieces (opinion essays, standard reviews, conference-length papers) and of article-length manuscripts. Prerequisite requirement: 6 graduate credits.

JL MC 547. Science Communication. (Dual-listed with JL MC 347). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.
Reporting and writing about science and technology topics for general audiences. Outlets for stories include print, broadcast and online media. Story topics include reporting about basic, applied sciences and social sciences, as well as ethical, political and policy issues related to science and technology. Prerequisite requirements:

  • C+ or better in JL MC 202 or JL MC 206 or JL MC 321 for Jl MC majors
  • C+ or better in JL MC 201 and ADVRT 334 or ADVRT 336 for Advrt majors
  • Nonmajors and minors by permission of instructor.